One Love

from New York Times: The Pepsi-Cola Company, long famous for elaborate, expensive spots stuffed with celebrities, music and special effects, is forgoing them for the multimillion-dollar Pepsi One campaign, now getting under way.
The TV commercials that helped introduce Pepsi One, which ran from 1998 to 2001 during high-profile programs like the Super Bowl and featured stars like Cuba Gooding Jr. and Kim Cattrall, are being replaced. In their stead are offbeat alternatives that include promotional events, online films, posters put up on construction sites, even trading cards.
oneify.jpg
The campaign features oddball characters created by Geoff McFetridge, a Southern California graphic designer who has worked for ESPN X Games, Nike and the young directors Sofia Coppola and Spike Jonze.
Its theme, “Oneify,” is intended to bounce off the brand name as well as address seemingly contradictory trends in the youth market signaled by the word “one.” Twenty-somethings often say they want to be perceived as individuals but also identify collectively with their peers.
“Kids are so smart, they’ll call you out on overt marketing in a minute,” said Lee Clow, chairman and chief creative officer at TBWA Worldwide, the agency responsible for the Pepsi One work. “So telling them a ‘one-calorie, great taste’ story is so ho-hum to them.”
“If you engage them in unorthodox ways, with a bit of grace, charm, whimsy, fun and discovery,” he added, “you can actually ask them to buy something.”

About David Burn

I wrote my first ad for a political candidate when I was 17 years old. She won her race and I felt the seductive power of advertising for the first time. Today—after working for seven agencies in five states—I am now head of brand strategy and creative direction at Bonehook in Portland, Oregon.