Smart May Be The New Sexy But Sex Appeal Can’t Save Newspapers

Look, I’m sympathetic to the cause, but I’ve noticed the decreasing time and attention that I devote to reading printed newspapers and magazines. Courtesy of its online site, the New York Times looks at a new campaign being launched by the Newspaper Association of America:

“Be able to find Iran on a map,” says one ad that shows an illustration of a woman reading a print newspaper at a table. “Know what the city council is up to behind closed doors,” it continues.

“There’s no question that newspapers are undergoing a significant transformation, and we wanted to underline some of that,” said Caroline Little, chief executive of the N.A.A. “It’s a campaign for what newspapers represent, whether they are in print, online or mobile.”

With revenues and subscription numbers in decline, newspapers need to do something to keep their relevance today. But I wonder how much pull any ad campaign on behalf of a medium will have. Ultimately, it’s up to each town’s newspaper to make itself vital to its community. And with sites like Patch providing localized community news while the AP provides national and international content, newspapers are simply stuck in the middle.

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About Dan Goldgeier

Dan Goldgeier is a Seattle-based freelance copywriter with experience at advertising agencies across the U.S. He is a graduate of the Creative Circus ad school, and currently teaches at Seattle's School of Visual Concepts. Dan is also a columnist for TalentZoo.com and the author of View From The Cheap Seats and Killer Executions and Scrubbed Decks.