Will British Ad People Automatically Switch Agencies Along With Accounts?

From The New York Times:

When an advertiser’s relationship with its agencies goes sour, a breakup is often the best course for everyone involved. But some people in London’s marketing world are now concerned that a new regulation could threaten this easy-come, easy-go existence.
Lawyers said the rule, which went into effect in April, could require an advertising agency taking on new business to hire employees who worked on the account at the client’s former agency. While the law is intended to protect workers, lawyers say that it also threatens to make advertising account shifts prohibitively expensive or simply counterproductive.
In theory, the regulation could also affect other professional services like law, accounting and consulting. But the rule specifies that the affected employees must work “wholly or predominantly” for a single client, something that is more likely to happen in marketing than in many other professions. Indeed, in an effort to win more business from multinational marketers or to serve their needs more efficiently, many agencies have set up teams or even stand-alone units dedicated to a specific client.

Wow. Any British AdPulpers out there want to comment on this? Is this a big issue over there?

About Dan Goldgeier

Blogging on AdPulp since 2005, Dan Goldgeier is a Seattle-based freelance copywriter with experience at advertising agencies across the U.S. He is a graduate of the Creative Circus ad school, and currently teaches at Seattle's School of Visual Concepts. In addition, he is a regular columnist for TalentZoo.com. Dan published the best of his TalentZoo.com columns in a book entitled View From The Cheap Seats: A Broader Look at Advertising, Marketing, Branding, Global Politics, Office Politics, Sexual Politics, and Getting Drunk During a Job Interview. Look for it on Amazon in paperback and e-book editions.

  • http://www.scampblog.blogspot.com Scamp

    It will probably never happen.
    But if it does, I feel sorry for the clients.
    After all, it’s not an agency’s dodgy carpets or lighting that cause them to move their account, but the people.
    The last thing they want is to get stuck with the same old duffers at the new place.