What’s A Blog? Hey, We Need One Of Those.

Blogs blogs blogs. Blah blah blah.
eMarketer.com reports that only 30% of Fortune 1000 executives know what a blog is. The piece also says only 20% have a process in place to monitor blog conversations about their company.
I’m not sure these figures are going to surprise and elighten anyone. So, mainstream marketers are not up to speed yet. Okay. After more maverick brands pave the way, I’m sure the late adopters will pay more attention.
There’s no such thing as patience today.

About David Burn

Co-founder and editor of AdPulp. I wrote my first ad for a political candidate when I was 17 years old. She won her race and I felt the seductive power of advertising for the first time. I worked for seven agencies in five states before launching my own practice in 2009. Today, I am head of brand strategy and creative at Bonehook in Portland, Oregon.

Comments

  1. this is absoluletly true. in my country, even less than 30%! the lower level managers and employees know what blog is and contribute to blogging community but as for the upper levels, there is another picture…

  2. DuaneWayne says:

    I’d be curious to know – no snark intended – who the other 70% were, and how their ignorance is (or isn’t) hurting their bottom line.
    Blogs are nice, sure. But hardly the end-all be-all, and not for every brand / audience.
    Is a blog gonna make me buy Fritos more often? Sheesh.
    And I say that as a blogger m’self.

  3. Is a blog gonna make me buy Fritos more often?
    Is a TV spot? How ’bout a print ad in Rolling Stone? Word-of-mouth?
    A blog needn’t move the sales needle to be effective as a PR vehicle, customer relations tool or brand builder.
    Smart brands invest in all methods, and see what works best together.

  4. DuaneWayne says:

    “A blog needn’t move the sales needle to be effective as a PR vehicle, customer relations tool or brand builder.”
    I take your point. But, that said, if the return on the TV spot was a mere 5%, and the return on the blog .005%, I’d probably walk away from the blog, too – maybe out of ignorance, or at the expense of my future customers, yes. But maybe also simply out of ROI.
    Blogs live or die not by PR but through dialogue — consumer passion / inspiration / input / feedback. Something I’m not convinced all products/brands in blog-sufficient levels.
    Have or *need*, for that matter.
    (Anyone really care enough to write/rant about drywall? Floss? Socks? G-P, P&G, Hanes)
    … That said, I do agree it’s worth the toe in the water, more often than not.