What Gandhi Can Teach Us About Advertising

That’s a headline you don’t see every day. From MyNews in India:

Most people picture Mahatma Gandhi as some gentle, fragile man who people followed because he was just so peaceful. Gandhi wasn’t an idle peacenik; he was a perceptive communicator who would have been right at home in today’s ad industry.
But the truth is he wasn’t just some sappy dude who sat around all day smiling. He was a sharp lawyer who had a mind for smart communication. He was non-violent, but not passive. He devastated an empire by taking residence in people’s minds. He knew how the media worked and how to get attention. He spread his message by causing peaceful civil disobedience that got talked about in international press and word of mouth. That’s the power of a story worth discussing.

Read the rest here. Who are the Gandhis in the ad world? Are you one?

About Dan Goldgeier

Blogging on AdPulp since 2005, Dan Goldgeier is a Seattle-based freelance copywriter with experience at advertising agencies across the U.S. He is a graduate of the Creative Circus ad school, and currently teaches at Seattle's School of Visual Concepts. In addition, he is a regular columnist for TalentZoo.com. Dan published the best of his TalentZoo.com columns in a book entitled View From The Cheap Seats: A Broader Look at Advertising, Marketing, Branding, Global Politics, Office Politics, Sexual Politics, and Getting Drunk During a Job Interview. Look for it on Amazon in paperback and e-book editions.

  • http://adpulp.com David Burn

    Who are the Ghandis in the ad world? Are you one?
    This is the toughest question you’ve ever posed, Mr. G.
    When I think of the people I admire in this business, it’s almost always about their work, not their contributions to humanity.
    As far as being a shrewd media strategist there are plenty of people who fit that description. But for what purpose are they shrewd? If you’re in this business, you’re purpose is to make whatever brands you’re supporting top of mind. Hardly a noble purpose.
    Yet, there are good people in this line of work. People with big ideas and the ability to communicate them effectively. We/they/I just need to find a way to bring a higher purpose to our work. It can be as simple as doing everything in your power to respect the audience. They’re not numbers, nor users, nor targets. They’re people our clients want to talk to.