Utterly Depressing Or A Necessary Reality Check?

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Regarding Hugh MacLeod’s latest doodle, Rob at Six Sentences only takes three words to say, “Delicious. Awful. Accurate.” What say you?

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About David Burn

Native Nebraskan in the Pacific Northwest. Chief Storyteller at Bonehook, a guide service and bait shop for brands. Co-founder and editor of AdPulp. Contributor to The Content Strategist. Doer of the things written about herein.

  • kokomjolk

    If Samwell can gain notoriety and make money off of, “What What in tha Butt,” than I have to think you can make the case that anyone can rise above if they make the right content.
    I will now go back to writing headlines, sorry for piping up, sir. No, please, let me have my dinner rations, I promise I’ll keep quiet.

  • howorignl

    Unless you’re one of any number of now-famous people who actually did sell their screenplays, direct feature films, go on to fame/fortune in music/art/etc. Not that I’ve got a list handy, but it’s happened often enough to be a realistic goal no matter what your day job is.
    Actually, this doodle sounds positive. It even ends with “Yay!”
    Good for you, sir. Way to look on the bright side.
    /enough with the whiny ad guy crap already
    //boring, boring, boring

  • http://godsofadvertising.wordpress.com Steffan Postaer

    There’s always the not-so-great American novel. Mine’s on Amazon!
    -SRP

  • http://adpulp.com David Burn

    I’m pretty sure that “Yay!” is ironic.

  • http://sixsentences.blogspot.com/ Rob

    “Yay!” is ironic? I love that! Yay!

  • fatc

    The whole “Yay!”sarcastic-or-not thing got me thinking:
    Is it sarcastic to make fun of sarcasm with more sarcasm?
    Or does doing so automatically mean you’re being genuine?
    Either way, Yay!

  • fatc

    Oops.
    David called it “ironic” not sarcastic.
    My bad.

  • Mike

    Why the fuck do people always assume I want to write a screenplay or get my art in the moma? What a cliche. I like advertising. At least it’s honest that it’s a business – which is exactly hat art and entertainment is too. Everybody’s got someone to answer to on some level, to pay the bills. This isn’t a half bad job by any means.

  • http://adpulp.com David Burn

    Interesting, Mike. I agree that we all “have to serve somebody,” as Bob Dylan made clear in song. And that advertising is a good place to serve.
    As for honesty, when I decided to pursue this line of work I convinced myself it was a more honest choice than journalism, since everyone knows you’re selling something in advertising (unlike journalism). I’ve since outgrown that POV.