The Underworld Of Below-The-Line Advertising

This is what you call a “slot topper.” I didn’t write this particular one, but it’s exactly what it sounds like.

slottopper3

Most copywriters, at one point or another, work on things considered “below-the-line.” But does this kind of work get any respect, or results?

Some people love to go around saying things like, “Advertising is the price companies pay for being unoriginal.” I’m not sure that’s true. We live in a world where only the top 1% of brands can avoid advertising because they get enough word of mouth or buzz, or they’re able to simply advance by power of sheer innovation or design. The rest have to advertise. Which means pretty much everyone’s doing it, and doing a lot of it.

It’s the subject of my new column on TalentZoo.com.

So what’s the oddest piece of below-the-line advertising you’ve ever worked on?

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About Dan Goldgeier

Blogging on AdPulp since 2005, Dan Goldgeier is a Seattle-based freelance copywriter with experience at advertising agencies across the U.S. He is a graduate of the Creative Circus ad school, and currently teaches at Seattle's School of Visual Concepts. In addition, he is a regular columnist for TalentZoo.com. Dan published the best of his TalentZoo.com columns in a book entitled View From The Cheap Seats: A Broader Look at Advertising, Marketing, Branding, Global Politics, Office Politics, Sexual Politics, and Getting Drunk During a Job Interview. Look for it on Amazon in paperback and e-book editions.