She Packed My Bags Last Night Pre-Flight

Are you up on vlogger du jour Amanda Cogdon? She has a site called Rocketboom and her ship is preparing for blast off.
Cogdon recently conduced an eBay auction for the first ad on Rocketboom.
Business Week reports that the winning bid was $40,000. The winning bidder is TRM, an ATM and photocopy services company.

Andrew Baron, the co-founder of Rocketboom says they aren’t saying more about the ads right now, but are “scrambling around to try and work another couple of deals from some of the other bidders.”
He says he’s amazed by how many major US brands stepped forward.

This news made Jeff Jarvis blow a gasket.

This is bad for big ad agencies and big advertisers who missed this boat bigtime. I’m not talking about any specific brand or company. They should have been falling over themselves to grab this unique bargain. And they should be slinking off with their long tails between their legs now. Advertisers constantly whine that they want to do something new, but when something new comes along, they freeze because they can’t fit the new thing into their definitions of old and safe.
Big advertisers and big agencies are chickenshit. They need to grow some balls or else they’ll find new competitors running circles around them. The explosion — the rocketboom — that has already come to newspapers, magazines, TV networks, the music industry is coming next to the ad business.
Please take this, advertisers, as a friendly kick in the pants.

Okay, so Coca-Cola didn’t lock up the media buy. Maybe they’ll get it next time. Baron did say he’s working on some deals. Anyway, let’s not overlook the move by TRM, a firm I’d not heard of, until now.

About David Burn

Co-founder and editor of AdPulp. I wrote my first ad for a political candidate when I was 17 years old. She won her race and I felt the seductive power of advertising for the first time. I worked for seven agencies in five states before launching my own practice in 2009. Today, I am head of brand strategy and creative at Bonehook in Portland, Oregon.