Review Me

Brands want to advertise on blogs. Startups are scrambling to deliver working business models that make this easy to do so. Some will succeed. Some will fail. Such is life on the internets.
ReviewMe.com is one of the new players, having launched just last week. ReviewMe.com is a service that connects advertisers and bloggers for the purpose of creating and placing paid product reviews. Advertisers win, because they get an easy to manage advertorial program. Bloggers win because they get paid to do what comes naturally to them.
Given that full disclose of paid reviews is required by ReviewMe.com, and the fact that bloggers can choose to write bad things about a product or company, I’d say, everyone wins in this equation.
Here how the service works. From the Publisher/Advertiser side, it is a simple matter of logging in to the site, picking blogs based upon their subject matter and targeting blogs that fall within their budget for reviews.
For Bloggers, just sit back. When an advertiser targets your blog, you will be notified that a review is a pending.
Currently, review value is set by ReviewMe.com based on a combination of publicly available traffic metrics.
One question that initally came to my mind is what is the difference between this and PayPerPost.com? ReviewMe.com does not require a positive review. Nor is their’s a pay-per-post model (technically-speaking). Bloggers are paid to write one review on the product or service at a minimum of 200 words. That is it. Advertisers cannot request “positive only” reviews.
At this early point in the launch, I think the service has a lot of potential. I know bloggers will adopt the service, but will ReviewMe.com be able to secure enough clients to make this work?
AdPulp.com is participating in the ReviewMe.com experiement. As such, we will always disclose when we have published a paid review in the final line in the post.
[FULL DISCLOSURE] This has been a paid review of ReviewMe.com.

About Shawn Hartley

Creative technologist by day. Bowling instructor at night. VP at Corporate 3 Design in Omaha. Proud father and husband.

  • http://www.getthemblogging.com dawn

    It’s great that there are some many models for PR and marketing people as well as for bloggers. To that end we’ve put together a database for bloggers willing to review products NOT as advertorial. We think this is a nice option for bloggers who aren’t comfortable writing content for pay and for PR/marketing people who want to keep their advertising separate from their solicited reviews. Like magazines where product write-ups, straight ads and (depending on the magazine) advertorials run side-by-side, we think bloggers will like having editorial options.