Push Gets Pushy, Talks Smack About Pull

Direct marketers get little respect from brand marketers, which is a shame. Everyone has something to give!

Now, I see that social media marketers get little respect from direct marketers, which is also a shame. Where’s the love?

4A_s SmartBrief

Direct marketing pro, Debra Ellis, writing in Target Marketing opens her can of whoop ass with a wicked snap (emphasis added).

Every good direct marketer knows the top company asset is the customer database. Almost anyone with marketing experience can turn that data into revenue. I say “almost” because there is still a social media movement trying to prove that direct mail and email marketing is dying. It’s doubtful that anyone in that group could create and execute an effective plan that delivers sales and profitability. But, for the rest of us, the people who understand that customer relationships are about the quality of service, a solid list is money in the bank.

Ellis goes on to wax direct poetic about the many charming aspects of email newsletters. For instance, she claims that “email marketing can do so much more than generate revenue and profits. In the right hands, it increases customer loyalty and reduces operating costs.”

Damn, I badly want some of this email marketing magic and its attendent profitability. Who wouldn’t?

Sadly, too many marketers and their agents see an email signup as a wide open invite to slam you with the shit they want you to know. However, email newsletters, like all communications, work best when filled with info that readers desire, not navel gazing brand lint.

Editor’s Note: Would you like to receive an email newsletter from AdPulp? If so, would you prefer daily, weekly or monthly mailings?

About David Burn

I wrote my first ad for a political candidate when I was 17 years old. She won her race and I felt the seductive power of advertising for the first time. Today, I'm the founder and creative director at Bonehook in Portland, Oregon. We bring integrated marketing solutions to our clients in healthcare, human services, real estate, fashion, outdoor recreation, and food and beverage.