Not To Be Confused With MSN’s Spaces

New York Times: Created in the fall of 2003 as a looser, music-driven version of www.friendster.com, MySpace quickly caught on with millions of teenagers and young adults as a place to maintain their home pages, which they often decorate with garish artwork, intimate snapshots and blogs filled with frank and often ribald commentary on their lives, all linked to the home pages of friends.
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Although many people over 30 have never heard of MySpace, it has about 27 million members, a nearly 400 percent growth since the start of the year. It passed Google in April in hits, the number of pages viewed monthly, according to comScore MediaMetrix, a company that tracks Web traffic.
“They’ve just come out of nowhere, and they’re huge,” David Card, a senior analyst with Jupiter Research, said of MySpace. “They’ve done a number of things that were really smart. One was blogging. People have been doing personal home pages for as long as the Internet’s been around, but they were one of the first social networks to jump on that. They’ve also jumped on music, and there’s a lot of traffic surrounding that.”
Even the founders seem taken aback. “I don’t want to say it’s overwhelming,” said Tom Anderson, 29, who created MySpace with Chris DeWolfe, 39, “but I see these numbers coming out, I keep thinking, it must be a mistake. How can we pass Google? I mean, my mom knows Google, but she doesn’t know MySpace.”
One adult who has paid attention is Rupert Murdoch, the chief executive of the News Corporation, which agreed in July to pay $580 million to buy the site’s parent company.

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About David Burn

Native Nebraskan seeking the perfect pale ale in the Pacific Northwest. Disc golfer. Fan of Kurt Vonnegut, community radio and wolves in the wild. Copywriter and brand strategist at Bonehook. Co-founder and editor of AdPulp.