No Lame Names

Last month, Adweek spoke to Steve Stone, president and creative director at Heat/San Francisco.

Q. Why do you give your agencies names rather than calling them Stone & Elder, etc.?
A. I have always wanted aplace where people could feel like they could be part of a bigger entity, to emotionally feel like they belong to something. When the partners’ names are on the door, it’s hard for people to feel a true connection that lasts.

Here’s more on Stone’s naming conventions, from The San Francisco Chronicle:

The Black Rocket founders had taken the name of a steam locomotive, Rocket, built by a British engineer, George Stephenson, that won a race in 1829. They liked the analogy: Stephenson had come from big companies, while they had come from large agencies to try to make it on their own.
“Heat,” said Stone, offers itself to “clients … who may have brands or products that have gone cold.”

About David Burn

I wrote my first ad for a political candidate when I was 17 years old. She won her race and I felt the seductive power of advertising for the first time. After working for seven agencies in five states and freelancing for several more, I ventured out on my own in 2009. Today, as head of brand strategy and creative at Bonehook in Portland, Oregon, I'm focused on providing effective integrated marketing solutions to mid-market clients.

Comments

  1. Great article. It relates to all areas of business, especially sales. Without a good name (product, service, company) its harder for prospects and customers to feel a connection to you.
    I linked your post at http://www.landingthedeal.com. Thanks for your thoughts on the subject!