Make This Van Sing

Victor & Spoils, “the world’s first creative (ad) agency built on crowdsourcing principles,” is conducting a contest for its client DISH Network.
white_panel_van.png
99 Designs is hosting the contest, whose aim it is to “develop a creative look and message for DISH Network installation vans in order to attract new customers.”
Five winners will be awarded $2,500 each. Thus far, 50 entries have been submitted, but none have gotten a mark (assigned by Victor & Spoils) over one star.
The jury’s out on crowdsourcing, but clearly it’s a growing field. One thing I’m curious about is how teams might form to solve these design puzzles. In the case of DISH Network the brief calls for a “creative look and message.” That one-two calls for a team effort. It needs a concept and possibly some pretty tight copy.
Let’s say I happened to think of a concept for this project…what would I do with it? I’m not a designer, so I’d need to work with one in order to submit, and then split the proceeds provided we won. But why would I bother? Why would any senior creative, or creative team, give this, or any other contest the time of day?
Seriously, are these contents for juniors and students only? That’s not how they’re being framed.

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About David Burn

Native Nebraskan seeking the perfect pale ale in the Pacific Northwest. Copywriter and brand strategist at Bonehook. Co-founder and editor of AdPulp. Contributor to The Content Strategist. Doer of the things written about herein.

  • http://kissmyblackads.blogspot.com craig

    I’m with you how does one really profit from this? From the looks of their chosen crowd-sourced logo, I question the teams design aesthetic. Having said that; it is an interesting concept and I’m very tempted to jump in. It totally goes against my less than solid stance against spec work, but it’s just so damn interesting.

  • Whitney Shada

    The entire concept of “crowdsourcing” is controversial in my eyes. The idea seems effective at its core (engaging potential customers in internal efforts) but in it’s exectution, this idea may struggle.
    The message crowdsourcing sends to customers is this, “we are unable to come up with an adequate concept on our own, we need your help.” The consumer wants to believe that the people working for a company know more than they do about that particular product and all that surrounds it. If one feels they must contribute to the efforts of a company they are soon to invest in, chances are the credibility is questionable.

  • Whitney Shada

    The entire concept of “crowdsourcing” is controversial in my eyes. The idea seems effective at its core (engaging potential customers in internal efforts) but in it’s exectution, this idea may struggle.
    The message crowdsourcing sends to customers is this, “we are unable to come up with an adequate concept on our own, we need your help.” The consumer wants to believe that the people working for a company know more than they do about that particular product and all that surrounds it. If one feels they must contribute to the efforts of a company they are soon to invest in, chances are the credibility is questionable.