Keep Your Ideas To Yourself Please, Says McDonald’s.

I understand our overly litigous society prevents a corporation like McDonald’s from accepting unsolicited ideas. I also understand how 20th century this policy is. Larry Light, my man, the copy below is a big red STOP SIGN on the McD’s web site–a site that needs to be scrapped and rebuilt on a better, more open, communications foundation.
Unsolicited Ideas
Thank you for your interest to share an idea for a product or service that you believe would be beneficial to McDonald’s. Please know, however, that it is McDonald’s company’s policy not to consider unsolicited ideas from anyone other than our corporate employees, franchise owners and dedicated suppliers.
It’s not that great ideas cannot come from our valued customers. Each year, however, McDonald’s receives thousands of unsolicited ideas and proposals for products and services. Due to the mass volume of these unsolicited ideas and the business challenge of determining what is truly a “new” idea versus a concept that is already in development, being tested, or previously considered, we must adhere to a strict policy not to accept or review any unsolicited ideas that come from outside the McDonald’s system of our corporate employees, franchise owners and suppliers.
As a result, we must decline your invitation to review your idea, and hope you can understand and appreciate our business reasons for making this company decision. We do, however, greatly appreciate your interest in McDonald’s.

About David Burn

Co-founder and editor of AdPulp. I wrote my first ad for a political candidate when I was 17 years old. She won her race and I felt the seductive power of advertising for the first time. I worked for seven agencies in five states before launching my own practice in 2009. Today, I am head of brand strategy and creative at Bonehook in Portland, Oregon.


  1. McDonald’s, I’m Haten’ It!

    I prefer to avoid talking negatively about another company, but this irked me. I was shocked to read that McDonalds doesn’t want to hear suggestions from their customers. They assume they know everything. How can a company in today’s market…

  2. Clyde Hogg says:

    McDonald’s ought to think twice about those unsolicited ideas, considering the solicited ones they’ve been getting and using for the last decade.