In the “Did You Know?” Category


The New York Times takes note of the above ad created by Santo, an Argentine agency.

“When we talked to consumers about Coke, we realized they didn’t know that it has no added preservatives or artificial flavors,” said Cathryn Sleight, marketing director of Coca-Cola Great Britain. “We felt it was important to reassure Coke drinkers of this fact.”

In other words, this is a spot made from research, not creativity.

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About David Burn

Native Nebraskan in the Pacific Northwest. Chief Storyteller at Bonehook, a guide service and bait shop for brands. Co-founder and editor of AdPulp. Contributor to The Content Strategist. Doer of the things written about herein.

  • http://adpulp.com Pepsi Drinker

    What a bunch of nonsense.
    First, Pemberton invented Coke as a dyspeptic—something to cure stomach aches. Searched for the finest spices? Sure, in his chemistry kit.
    Coke has no added preservatives or artificial flavours? That’s a bit of a weasel, as we’d say in the U.S. Coke is about 99% sugar and water. It does contain artificial coloring (or colouring). Why would it need preservatives? And it has no artificial flavours because, well, why would anyone need to invent a cola-like flavour?
    Coke as a client hasn’t changed over the decades. They’ll still buy any concept that features their bottle and labels and hypes its irrelevant heritage.

  • http://www.adpulp.com Danny G

    I seem to recall that 7-UP dude always saying “never had it, never will” about caffeine or something.
    I’m in Atlanta and drinking a Diet Coke right now, but I gotta say, this ad sucks.

  • adman

    “…this is a spot made from research, not creativity.”
    I’d venture to say that most, if not all, good ads come from some form of ‘research’. Whether it be searching for a human truth or gleaning new information from a–God help us–focus group, a good ad tells the audience something they don’t already know.
    What this ad fails to do is creatively interpret their findings.

  • http://multicultclassics.blogspot.com HighJive

    adman,
    You’re sorta splitting pubic hairs on Diet Coke cans, to make a bizarre reference to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. I think David meant what you said—the agency failed to do anything creative, thinking the research was enough. But I would add they didn’t even do good research. The client’s statement seems to imply it: “When we talked to consumers about Coke, we realized they didn’t know that it has no added preservatives or artificial flavors.” Sounds like they loaded the deck versus mining for real insights. That is, I’ll bet they asked the groups, “Did you know Coke has no added preservatives or artificial flavors?” Why else would the notion even come up? Sure, Coke has no added preservatives or artificial flavors. But it’s not like consumers will take that to mean Coke’s a healthy product. We still know the soft drink will burn the rust off an old chunk of metal. The research doesn’t lead to a real benefit or real motivation for drinking the real thing. The spot was made from bad research, and worsened by no creativity.