I’ll Have A Foot-Long Turkey With Extra Guilt

Watching football today, I saw an odd spot for Subway. We see B&W images of hurricane victims and a solemn voice-over saying how Subway will donate an upcoming day’s profits to hurricane victims.
You can see a :15 version of the spot at Subway’s web site where it says “Hurricane Relief Efforts.”
It’s all perfectly tasteful until the last line of the spot comes. The VO says:
“Because it’s tough to pick up the pieces when they’ve all blown away.”
Now, like a lot of copywriters, I was taught that the last line of copy should always have a little extra zing, or wrap-up nicely, or whatever you want to call it.
But this one just creeped me out, for some reason. What do y’all think?

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About Dan Goldgeier

Blogging on AdPulp since 2005, Dan Goldgeier is a Seattle-based freelance copywriter with experience at advertising agencies across the U.S. He is a graduate of the Creative Circus ad school, and currently teaches at Seattle's School of Visual Concepts. In addition, he is a regular columnist for TalentZoo.com. Dan published the best of his TalentZoo.com columns in a book entitled View From The Cheap Seats: A Broader Look at Advertising, Marketing, Branding, Global Politics, Office Politics, Sexual Politics, and Getting Drunk During a Job Interview. Look for it on Amazon in paperback and e-book editions.

  • http://texturl.net brandon

    Bad pun, extra bad because it tries to play off a disaster.
    Leaves a bad taste in my mouth too.

  • http://advertisingwithoutpity.typepad.com advertisingwithoutpity

    They might as well have gone for some kind of rhyming pun-couplet:
    “Because it’s tough to stay afloat when your house is accessible only by boat.”

  • Josh

    Like it or not, it is what took place. Some people are simply too sensitive and others look for the smallest item to show how they think they are smarter than others.

  • Carl LaFong

    I like it. Granted, I haven’t seen the commercial, so maybe the line loses something in context. But rather than trivializing the tragedy by reducing it to a clever tagline, I think it sums up the magnitude of the devastation in a simple yet compelling way.