Hurry Up And Add ‘Slow Down’ To Your To-Do List

Last week at the Seattle Interactive Conference, Cal McAllister, co-founder of Wexley School For Girls, gave an inspiring presentation on his agency. One of his agency’s tenets was a very simple one: “Slow Down.” In other words, don’t rush ideas out into the world until they’re ready.

Great advice, but hard to implement. Because everything these days is so ridiculously fast-paced, and whether it’s from our co-workers or from brands, we expect instant responses and instant gratification.

When the speed of life and business speeds up, we lose our patience with everything. My handwriting was never particularly clear, but now it’s pretty much illegible. Why? Because my mind is now several steps ahead of my wrist: I’m obsessed with finishing the writing motions as quickly as possible. I’m in a rush to get on to my next task.

Is there any stopping this increased frenetic pace? Even new marketing principles reflect this. It’s now a common refrain for marketing gurus to say, “Just get it out there and perfect it later,” particularly when it comes to digital initiatives. But the wrong idea, or an unfinished one disseminated too quickly, can backfire on a brand.

It’s the subject of my new column on TalentZoo.com, which will be on the home page Thursday.

About Dan Goldgeier

Blogging on AdPulp since 2005, Dan Goldgeier is a Seattle-based freelance copywriter with experience at advertising agencies across the U.S. He is a graduate of the Creative Circus ad school, and currently teaches at Seattle's School of Visual Concepts. In addition, he is a regular columnist for TalentZoo.com. Dan published the best of his TalentZoo.com columns in a book entitled View From The Cheap Seats: A Broader Look at Advertising, Marketing, Branding, Global Politics, Office Politics, Sexual Politics, and Getting Drunk During a Job Interview. Look for it on Amazon in paperback and e-book editions.

  • http://adpulp.com David Burn

    Nice article, Dan. There’s a lot to be said for the slow lane.