Careful What You Say

from The New York Times: Against the backdrop of the Macworld Exposition in San Francisco this week, a series of legal actions filed by Apple Computer over the last month highlights the difficulties of defining who is a journalist in the age of the Web log.
As part of a lawsuit filed by Apple in Santa Clara County Superior Court on Dec. 13, the company obtained a court order allowing it to issue subpoenas to, and The three Web sites published or linked to information on what they said was a future Apple audio device that was code-named “Asteroid.” The subpoenas are aimed at getting the operators of those sites to disclose the sources of the information that was reportedly leaked.
An attorney representing AppleInsider and PowerPage asserted that bloggers ought to be extended the same protections as mainstream journalists, who have traditionally been given some latitude by the courts in protecting the identities of confidential sources.
“Apple does not seek to discourage communication protected by the free-speech guarantees of the United States and California Constitutions,” Apple said in the suit. “These constitutionally protected freedoms, however, do not extend to defendants’ unlawful practice of misappropriating and disseminating trade secrets acquired through the deliberate violation of known duties of confidentiality.”

About David Burn

Co-founder and editor of AdPulp. I wrote my first ad for a political candidate when I was 17 years old. She won her race and I felt the seductive power of advertising for the first time. I worked for seven agencies in five states before launching my own practice in 2009. Today, I am head of brand strategy and creative at Bonehook in Portland, Oregon.


  1. iPod Shuffle and Mac Mini

    At Macworld San Francisco today, Steve Jobs introduced a new iPod and a ‘headless’ Mac. Mac Mini Catering to the crowd who has been begging for a cheap Mac, Apple introduced two ‘headless’ units, a 40GB 1.2GHz G4 based unit…